U.s. policy on western expansion - …

To start, both periods did, however, remain quite similar in that they both justified expansion with notions of Anglo-Saxon supremacy, and of spreading the benefits of Western, Christian civilization....

By about 1914 Western civilization reached the high point of its long-standing global expansion.
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That same month, Polk declared war against , claiming (falsely) that the Mexican army had “invaded our territory and shed American blood on American soil.” The war proved to be relatively unpopular, in part because many Northerners objected to what they saw as a war to expand the “slaveocracy.” In 1846, Congressman David Wilmot attached a proviso to a war-appropriations bill declaring that slavery should not be permitted in any part of the Mexican territory that the U.S. might acquire. Wilmot’s measure failed to pass, but it made explicit once again the sectional conflict that haunted the process of westward expansion.


U.s. policy on western expansion | Jelks & White

In the second half of the 1800's, the railroad, which was invented in England, had a major effect on Western expansion in the United States.
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Throughout the 1800’s, westward expansion harmed the natives, was an invasion of their land, which led to war and tension between the natives and America, specifically the Cherokee Nation....


U.S. government’s policies towards Native American tribes.

This promised to upset the careful balance that the Missouri Compromise had achieved, and the annexation of Texas and other Mexican territories did not become a political priority until the enthusiastically expansionist cotton planter was elected to the presidency in 1844. Thanks to the maneuvering of Polk and his allies, Texas joined the union as a slave state in February 1846; in June, after negotiations with Great Britain, Oregon joined as a free state.

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (U.S. National …

Although the United States expansionism may have been a major success internally in the West, it certainly wasn’t nearly as successful on an international scale....

Think Again: U.S. Foreign Aid – Foreign Policy

Southern politicians and slave owners demanded that slavery be allowed in the West because they feared that a closed door would spell doom for their economy and way of life.

How U.S. immigration laws and rules have changed …

The grandiose and decisive policies of American presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Polk saw the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River absorbed into the Union, extending the nation west to the Pacific and south to Mexico....

China's Push Into Western Pacific Alarms U.S

Westward expansion had been an integral aspect of the American identity and its citizens were left wondering what would continue to propel the United States into the future.