However, the women of the time are rarely mentioned in Beowulf.

The Danes were maddened by this and began to be resentful towards the Frisians and at the coming of Spring they renewed the fight and killed Finn, and robbed him thoroughly....

Contrary to Pagan belief Beowulf is seen as the epitome of good and beneficent to all of mankind.
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While many things define an epic poem, one very important aspect is that the hero of the story is identified with society, the hero, Beowulf clearly identifies himself with both the Dane and Geat people....


According to the Danes in the epic, Beowulf is viewed as a savior.

In this epic poem, these two religions come through the actions of its characters.
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The choice of categories of boasting are determined by when the events have occurred or will occur; the first type of boasting refers to the speaker bragging about existing or previously occurring successes; the second type of boasting refers to the speaker making a vow towards future heroic accomplishments.


Beowulf often refers to another being rather than the Christian God.

While the Odyssey and Beowulf are each examples of both historic and modern ideas of heroism, the acts of Beowulf’s hero seem to fit better within its context.

There are some problems in studying a text such as Beowulf....

It is a poem that follows Beowulf through his life as he comes to the aid of the king of Danes and at a relatively young age slays a couple of dragons....

In the poem the heroes name is Beowulf....

“ has come down from heathen times and acquired its Christian character gradually and piecemeal from a succession of minstrels.” ( Hector Monro Chadwick as quoted by Brodeur 182), while others believed that Christianity and Paganism both belonged in the poem....

Paganism and Christianity in the Epic Poem "Beowoulf"

Beowulf becomes an outsider while in contrast with other generally perceived outcast characters such as Unferth or the monster Grendel and his unnamed mother....

In the case of the epic poem, Beowulf, this is also true.

Conversely the protagonist, Beowulf, and his portrayal of godlike perfection allows the reader to interpret Beowulf himself as the central outcast, existing in an imperfect world.

During the ninth century scramaseaxes started to become longer.

In Hebrew writings, early readers probably saw the passage as a mere narrative to explain humanity's herptophobias, but early in the Christian tradition, New Testament thinkers sought to reconcile the Old Testament and the New Testament. Accordingly, the author of Romans 16:20 interpreted the "seed of the woman" as being the offspring of the Virgin Mary (Christ). Several Church fathers such as Justin Martyr and Irenaeus elaborated upon the passage, treating the "bruising of thy heel" as the act of crucifixion, and so forth. The idea of the protevangelium becomes part of Milton's Paradise Lost, in which the fallen angel Lucifer literally transforms into a serpent to strike at Christ's creation, but the Archangel Michael explains to Adam how God, through mysterious providence, will allow the offspring of Eve in the form of Christ to crush the serpent eventually. See Book XII, lines 380 et passim of Milton's Paradise Lost.