I wrote ATM software for banks in the '80s

Living in a box
Reportedly shot for a mere $7000, writer-director-star Shane Carruth’s deliciously confounding debut shows that great ideas cost next to nothing. When the box of tricks they’ve knocked together in their garage starts behaving in ways they neither expect nor understand, so begins an escalating series of conundrums for Aaron (Carruth) and his best buddy co-creator Abe (Sullivan).

The Big Idea: Arthouse and sci-fi find common ground in the tale of a suicidal man unstuck in time.
Photo provided by Flickr

Director: Steven SpielbergCast: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff GoldblumBest quote: ‘Must go faster.’The Big Idea: That however much science mucks about with the building blocks of nature, life will always seek its own path.The lost world, found
Everybody loves dinosaurs – as long as they’re just bones in a museum. Steven Spielberg’s rollercoaster thriller, adapted from Michael Crichton’s bestselling novel, brings these prehistoric beasts back to life with a clever conceit: scientists have discovered how to harness dino DNA from fossilised amber and billionaire John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) has created an island zoo where spectators pay top dollar to view the cretaceous giants. All well and good until the security system fails and T-Rex and friends go on a chomping rampage.The cast, led by Sam Neill as a gruff, kid-hating paleontologist and Jeff Goldblum as a chaos-theory rockstar, is an absolute delight. And Spielberg still knows how to build a nail-biter of a set-piece, like the tense velociraptor kitchen sequence or the central tyrannosaurus attack that was a landmark showcase for then-nascent CGI technology. Keith Uhlich


Will Cloning Ever Save Endangered Animals

The Big Idea: Time travel and dimension-jumping as just another aspect of teen angst and isolation.
Photo provided by Pexels

The Big Idea: A story of radicalism and questioning authority, as well as a critique of a society that values youth over wisdom.


BBC Watchdog reveals how car thieves use hi-tech …

The Big Idea: The plot may be a mishmash of alien invasion ideas, but it’s the amazing, untrained cast that make this Britcom soar.

Clones Are People, Too - TV Tropes

Director: Richard FleischerCast: Stephen Boyd, Raquel Welch, Donald PleasenceBest quote: ‘Where are we? The corpuscles are blue.’The Big Idea: An inner-space adventure that has a medical team miniaturised to perform a life-saving operation inside the brain.I’ve got you under my skin
The tension between its highly imaginative central conceit and the available special-effects technology struggling to put it on screen gives movies like Richard Fleischer’s intravenous thriller a special charm that no longer exists in the era of CGI. Rooted in Cold War paranoia, the story has a crack medical team miniaturised in a submarine to venture within the circulatory system of a comatose defecting scientist.The production team – including legendary design wizard Harper Goff – bring a brightly-coloured tangibility to the recreation of a world that lies inside us all. Less impressive is the only-too-obvious back-projection, but the smart idea of an admittedly arbitrary 60-minute limit before the crew start growing back to normal size generates cumulatively effective tension as debut gal Raquel Welch provides the glam and ever-reliable Donald Pleasence offers more than a hint of twitchy menace. Trevor Johnston

The Ethicurean: Chew the right thing

If only we could live our lives a second time…
This was the final installment in Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colours trilogy, a decidedly apolitical exploration of the relevance – or not – of the French Revolution’s ideals of freedom, equality and fraternity to everyday life in contemporary Europe. Set in Geneva, it tells of a fateful encounter between a sensitive young woman and a reclusive, misanthropic elderly judge. After initial disagreement, even hostility, they become friends – though had he been younger…

Small RNA asymmetry in RNAi: Function in RISC …

The production team – including legendary design wizard Harper Goff – bring a brightly-coloured tangibility to the recreation of a world that lies inside us all. Less impressive is the only-too-obvious back-projection, but the smart idea of an admittedly arbitrary 60-minute limit before the crew start growing back to normal size generates cumulatively effective tension as debut gal Raquel Welch provides the glam and ever-reliable Donald Pleasence offers more than a hint of twitchy menace. Trevor Johnston