CRIMINAL JUSTICE - Organizational Management

Description: In this course, students will assess the structure of the Canadian political systems. Students will explore differing political ideologies, and the development, structure, implementation and implications of public policy. Students will explore how political ideologies and structures impact community and criminal justice.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW73040
CoRequisites:

Feb 02, 2018 · A blog by staff and students from Canterbury Christ Church University

Colin Moses, ex-Prison Officers Association chair, has observed that ‘’. The impact of the drive to privatise has long been evident in prisons. Competition for the running of criminal and community justice services – prisons, policing and probation – reflects the inexorable process of ideologically driven marketisation. A relentless process of transforming our criminal justice system into a competitive market place in which the attainment of financial return, rather than social justice, is the primary driver is well underway.


System for Award Management - SAM

The mission of the Criminal Justice Section is to improve the criminal justice system and to serve its members, the profession and the public.

Description: This course will focus on the nature and extent of traumatic experiences among populations involved in community justice and criminal justice. Theories of trauma and their application in treatment and support environments will be explored, along with concepts and research related to resilience, social inclusion, hope, and recovery. The criminal justice system will be analyzed for how it responds to trauma. Students will examine community-based and professional models of trauma recovery, with a special focus on arts-based and peer support programs. Vicarious trauma will be studied and students will have opportunity to reflect upon how to maintain health while working in the field of trauma.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:


Software QA and Testing Resource Center - FAQ Part 1

Description: In this course, the student will be introduced to Canadian Law and the Canadian Legal System by becoming familiar with the language of the law and the terminology used throughout the administration of justice. Recognition of how law is established through judicial and legislative authority will be developed and the concepts and principles which form the structure and procedure of both civil and criminal law will be examined. This course enables the student to analyze the elements of an offence, to classify offences and to identify possible defenses in criminal cases. Students will examine specific elements of selected Criminal Code offences, such as offences against the person, against property and against public order. The student learns the responsibilities and limitations of citizens and officers in the context of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Students will research case law and assess its impact on criminal offences and use case law to argue or defend decisions.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

TJB | JBCC | JBCC Statutes, Rules & Policies

Description: This course focuses on ethical issues faced by individuals working in the Canadian Criminal Justice System. It helps students to clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision-making within inter-professional, work environments. The course will develop practical skills related to critical reasoning, constructive shared problem-solving, inter-professional collaboration and approaches to ethical dilemmas. Students will develop self-awareness of the bases of their own values and ethical practices so that they may make informed ethical decisions. They will continue the development of a reflective learning portfolio.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

The Unwritten Constitution - Social Studies help

(Fulfills the general education requirement in behavioral and social sciences.) An overview of the major elements of the criminological enterprise. The objective is to classify and analyze different crime trends and patterns, analyze criminological theories, and conduct research. Topics include the nature of criminology, criminological methods, crime causation, and characteristics of types of crimes and offenders. The police, courts, and corrections and the effects of the criminal justice system in society are also examined.