"Jean Paul Sartre's Story "The Wall"." ThoughtCo.

While at ENS, Sartre met the woman who was to become his lifelong companion - Simone de Beauvoir. He and Simone had a mutual arrangement and a partnership that remained in place for years. However, they never married, for Sartre did not believe in such a "bourgeois" institution. Also at ENS, Sartre met Emmanuel Mounier, Raymond Aron, Claude Levi-Strauss, Jean Hippolyte, and Simone Weil. He became deeply immersed in philosophy, and once out of school moved to Berlin to study the works of Martin Heidegger and Edmund Husserl. He began frequenting the Left Bank cafes of 1930s Paris, which were quickly becoming hives of intellectual activity, and fought briefly in World War II. Once back in Paris after being released from a German prison, Sartre joined the Resistance and wrote for the magazines Les Lettres Francaises and Combat. After the war, he founded Les Temps Modernes, a monthly literary and political review.

Jean-Paul Sartre’s hellish theatrical metaphor “No Exit” is playing at the Pearl Theater Company.

Born in Paris in 1905 to Jean-Baptiste Sartre, an officer in the French navy, and Anne-Marie Schweitzer, Jean-Paul lost his father at the tender age of fifteen months. He attended the Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS) in Paris, one of the country's most prestigious schools, and graduated in 1929.


Jean-Paul Sartre - Biographical - Nobel Prize

Fifty years ago, Jean-Paul Sartre refused the Nobel prize for literature. His reputation has waned, but his intellectual struggle is still pertinent


Jean-Paul Sartre - Philosophy In An Hour - History in …

In "Being and Nothingness," Jean-Paul Sartre recommends skiing as a model of human behavior. But the trouble with skiing, says Sartre (with a slightly paranoid swerve) is that you leave tracks behind you. "The ideal form of sliding," he argues, "would therefore be one that leaves no trace: that is, sliding over water"' He might have been thinking of water-skiing, of course, but I have always liked to suppose it was surfing he had in mind.

The Best Books by Jean-Paul Sartre You Should Read

In addition to his plays Mr. Sartre was writing biographies of Baudelaire, the 19th-century poet, and Jean Genet. Mr. Genet, a man with a long criminal record who wrote exceeding well, was celebrated as an anti-hero--an orphan judged delinquent by society who had decided to play the role assigned to him.

Summary and Analysis of Jean Paul Sartre's Story "The …

In December 1944, Albert Camus, then editor of Combat, the main newspaper of the French Resistance, made Jean-Paul Sartre an offer he couldn't refuse: the job of American correspondent. Sartre, who had long dreamed about the United States, was delighted to get out of post-Liberation Paris. Camus himself would make the trip soon after, only to return with a characteristically different set of political, philosophical and personal impressions. Both would be kept under close surveillance by the F.B.I., who naturally suspected all philosophers of being subversives. In some sense, existentialism was going home. Twentieth-century French philosophy was not immune to the metaphysical turmoil of the United States at the end of the 19th century. More significantly, both Camus and Sartre had borrowed from 20th-century writers like Faulkner, Hemingway and Dos Passos -- and, of course, from the films of Humphrey Bogart. Camus, in particular, cultivated the trench coat with the upturned collar.

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In "Being and Nothingness," Jean-Paul Sartre recommends skiing as a model of human behavior. But the trouble with skiing, says Sartre (with a slightly paranoid swerve) is that you leave tracks behind you. "The ideal form of sliding," he argues, "would therefore be one that leaves no trace: that is, sliding over water"' He might have been thinking of water-skiing, of course, but I have always liked to suppose it was surfing he had in mind.