Native Americans in the United States - Wikipedia

Except for the concave curves near the base, White's vessel is within the range of forms known archaeologically for coastal Virginia, with which the Roanoke region belongs in its archaeological ceramic types. Three whole vessels reconstructed by archaeologists from shards left by Indians in the fill of the ditch of the Roanoke island fort after the departure of the English, belong to one of the pottery types found also at a late period in coastal Virginia; these vessels resemble White's illustration in form, as has been pointed out, but they differ in surface treatment (so far as can be judged from White's illustration) (see fig. 3). The light colour mentioned by Barlowe may fall at the lighter end of the range of vessel colours described by Evans for coastal Virginia, while White's colour is at (or past) the darker end. The parallel lines shown by White almost certainly represent partly smoothed-over junctures between the clay coils of which the vessel was constructed; plain ware shards from Virginia sometimes show such lines an inch or an inch and a half apart. Taking this as a scale, the vessel in White's water-colour has a mouth diameter of some 8-12 inches, which agrees very well with the ranges of mouth diameters given by Evans for the appropriate Virginia archaeological pottery types. If this reconstruction is correct, the pot in the engraved version is about twice as large as it should be in comparison to the size of the human figures.

One of the major differences that can be seen between American and Indian culture is ..

4 Apparently on the photo copy of the Strachey vocabulary in J. P. Harrington, 'The original Strachey vocabulary of the Virginia Indian language', , no. 46, Bureau of American Ethnology, no. 157 (1955), sheet 4, although this was read by Harrington, and by Wright and Geary in Strachey, , p.180 (the variation between and reflects a dialect difference in Virginia Algonkian noted by Geary in Strachey, p. 210). This is the source, by folk etymology, of the English term 'Match coat', widely used in colonial North America for a short Indian coat (including trade items) (G. Friederici, 'Amerikanistisches Wörterbuch', Universität Hamburg, Bd. 53 -Reihe B. Bd. 29, 1947 pp. 400-1).


A. DRAWING BY JOHN WHITE - Jamestown

4 Apparently on the photo copy of the Strachey vocabulary in J. P. Harrington, 'The original Strachey vocabulary of the Virginia Indian language', , no. 46, Bureau of American Ethnology, no. 157 (1955), sheet 4, although this was read by Harrington, and by Wright and Geary in Strachey, , p.180 (the variation between and reflects a dialect difference in Virginia Algonkian noted by Geary in Strachey, p. 210). This is the source, by folk etymology, of the English term 'Match coat', widely used in colonial North America for a short Indian coat (including trade items) (G. Friederici, 'Amerikanistisches Wörterbuch', Universität Hamburg, Bd. 53 -Reihe B. Bd. 29, 1947 pp. 400-1).