I read the poem, and had to read it again and again.

Through the use of ambiguity, metaphors, personification and paradoxes Emily Dickinson still gives readers a sense of vagueness on how she feels about dying.

She wrote many poems that discussed what it means not only to die, but to be dead.

Upon closer examination, however, the poem reveals his subconscious desire to have sex with his mother and his frustration about his inability to do so, resulting in the displacement of his sexual desires onto Dickinson.


This information should help the reader better understand the poem.

The speaker personifies death as a polite and considerate gentleman who takes her in a carriage for a romantic journey; however, at the end of this poem, she finishes her expedition realizing that she has died many years ago.


Emily Dickinson - Writer, Poet - Biography

In Emily Dickinson's poem 'Because I could not stop for Death,' she characterizes her overarching theme of Death differently than it is usually described through the poetic devices of irony, imagery, symbolism, and word choice.

Dickinson left several versions of this poem

Lord and his wife Elizabeth visited the Dickinson’s household often, and it wasn’t until his wife’s death did Lord pursue a relationship with Dickinson....

Emily Dickinson Poems and Poetry

These thematic ties are seen in such poems as "It might be lonelier," and "Some keep the Sabbath going to church." "Some keep the Sabbath going to Church" consists of the differences that exist between Dickinson's way of being close to God and many other people's ways of being close to God....

Neurotic Poets - Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

Her two poems: “Tell all the truth but tell it slant” and “Much madness is divinest sense” represent Dickinson’s quest to reveal the mystery and truth of life....

How did Emily Dickinson view death? | Justin Bowen

Since being introduced to this poem, I have heard many different interpretations either from others in my group or from reading about it in web sites or books.

Death in Emily | Emily Dickinson | Spirituality

Joyce Hart also says, "Dickinson's poem "Much Madness is Divinest Sense," has Emerson's writting in mind, influences the reader to interpret this poem in a way that might illustrate a rebillious young poet" (Hart 92).

is death death | Emily Dickinson | Syllable

Ferlazzo describes her writings: “Many students and casual readers of her poetry have enjoyed hearing tales about her which remind them of storybook heroines locked in castles, of beautiful maidens cruelty relegated to a life of drudgery...