Jack Kevorkian | Wiki & Bio | Everipedia

Within the movement known generally as death with dignity, the evaluation of Dr. Jack Kevorkian’s contribution might seem surprisingly qualified, and the praise decidedly muted.

This Biography is about Jack Kevorkian including his Height, weight,Age & Other Detail…

In 1987, Kevorkian started advertising himself in newspapers as a physician consultant for "death counseling". His first public assisted suicide was of a 54-year-old Alzheimer patient, Janet Adkins. She had been a member of an organization that advocates voluntary euthanasia for terminal patients. Using a machine he had designed called "the Thanatron", which was built for the purpose of suicide and would first administer a saline solution, then a pain killer and finally a fatal dose of potassium chloride, Kevorkian aided her suicide in a parked Volkswagen in a public park. He was consequentially charged with murder, but since the state of Michigan at the time had an indecisive stand on assisted suicide, he wasn't convicted. In 1991, the Thanatron was barred in Michigan by a legal injunction. Though Kevorkian also lost his medical license, he later claimed to have assisted in over 130 suicides over the following seven years. He designed another suicide machine, "the Mercitron", which basically consisted of a gas mask connected to a canister of carbon monoxide. After a bill prohibiting assisted suicide was passed, Kevorkian found himself on trial for murder four times. In three of those cases he was acquitted because the victims had been the ones who had taken the final action. The fourth ended in a mistrial. In 1998, Kevorkian, rather defiantly, allowed CBS to air a tape of him euthanizing Thomas Youk, an ALS patient. Afterwards, he dared the legal system to have him prosecuted. Needless to say, he was once again arrested. This time, he was found guilty of second-degree murder and sentenced to 10-25 years in prison. On June 1, 2007, only eight years into his sentence, he was paroled on good behavior on the condition that he wouldn't assist in any more suicides, though it didn't stop from lecturing about assisted suicide. He spent the remainder of his life doing that and was also an oil painter and jazz musician, releasing some of his work to the public. In 2008, he announced that he was planning to run for Congress as an independent candidate, but he wasn't elected. On June 3, 2011, he passed away from thrombosis. His epitaph reads "He sacrificed himself for everyone's rights".


Jack Kevorkian: How he made controversial history - BBC

Al Pacino taps into the underside of Jack Kevorkian, “Dr. Death,” in an HBO film.

At first, Kevorkian studied at the University of Michigan College of Engineering hoping to become a civil engineer, but quickly switched his studies to botany and biology. He finally settled on medical studies, graduating in 1952 and specializing in pathology. In 1953, when the Korean War began, he served 15 months in the U.S. Army as a medical officer and spent the rest of his service time in Colorado. While doing his residency in anatomical and clinical pathology, Kevorkian became fascinated with the act of dying and would photograph the eyes of terminal patients trying to pinpoint the exact moment of death. In 1958, he presented some of his views on euthanasia in a paper to a science journal, proposing that prisoners on death row could be used for medical experiments. Because of his views and odd experiments, his peers nicknamed him "Dr. Death". Because they also led to him becoming a minor celebrity, the university ejected him. He continued his internship at Pontiac General Hospital, where he experimented with transfusing blood from corpses to living patients. The experiments were succesful, but when Kevorkian proposed the idea to the Pentagon, hoping that the technique could be used on battlefields to help injured soldiers, he was for some reason denied a federal grant to continue his research. After becoming qualified as an expert in 1960, Kevorkian worked at different hospitals before settling down in Detroit and opening his own clinic.


Jack Kevorkian, horoscope for birth date 26 May 1928, …

Jack Kevorkian, who brought the debate over physician-assisted suicide into the spotlight, stepped out of prison having pledged not to assist anyone else.

Jack Kevorkian - Science and Technology biography

Jack Kevorkian, who brought the debate over physician-assisted suicide into the spotlight, stepped out of prison having pledged not to assist anyone else.

Jack Kevorkian Bio - Jack Kevorkian Net Worth

In an interview, Jack Kevorkian says he will no longer advise terminally ill people how to die. But he still combatively advocates physician-assisted suicide.

Assisted Suicide Proponent Dr. Jack Kevorkian Dies

In an interview, Jack Kevorkian says he will no longer advise terminally ill people how to die. But he still combatively advocates physician-assisted suicide.