Senator and 1964 Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater

Thousands of children in the U.S.A. are eligible for education savings accounts, a policy conceived by the Goldwater Institute to give families choice in education.

The role of Barry Goldwater in the history of the United States of America.

The most celebrated and perhaps most notorious of all political commercials was aired as a paid spot just once, during the NBC Movie of the Week on September 7, 1964. In Johnson’s ad, a young girl counts to ten as she picks the petals off a daisy. When she reaches nine, an ominous adult voice begins counting down to zero as a close-up of the little girl dissolves to a nuclear explosion. Tony Schwartz, the ad’s creator, called it "the first Rorschach test on the American public." Without mentioning Goldwater or citing any statements by him, the ad exploited the established public fear that he would start a nuclear war if elected president.


American Rhetoric: Barry Goldwater -- Speech Accepting …

Written By: Goldwater

The modern conservative movement was born in the 1960s. It started with a vehement hate for communism and developed a focus on social, economic, and domestic issues. Barry Goldwater was the first "modern" conservative candidate to win the Republican nomination. He did not fair well in the general election due to his hardline stance on many issues. In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan took the foundation of support built up in the Goldwater days and won the presidency by moving the party's focus away from communism and onto more domestic issues. His smooth rhetoric and skill at conveying the conservative message of small government, low taxes, strong military, local control, and moral administration inspired people to vote for him.


Barry Goldwater, Jr. | Perfil profissional

The Goldwater campaign vigorously protested the ad. Republican National Committee chairman Dean Burch said, "This horror-type commercial is designed to arouse basic emotions and has no place in the campaign." The Democrats withdrew it, but the controversy led to its being replayed in its entirety on network news and commentary programs, and the "daisy girl" made the cover of .

Visualizar o perfil de Barry Goldwater, Jr

President Kennedy had been impressed by the strikingly modern approach of the agency’s Volkswagen "Think Small" and Avis "We Try Harder" campaigns, and the agency was contracted by the Democrats in the summer of 1963. Madison Avenue had been avoiding the Democrats since the days of Stevenson, but the agency accepted the account promptly, later explaining to Johnson’s advisers, "We are deadly afraid of Goldwater and feel that the world must be handed a Johnson landslide."

Posts about Barry Goldwater written by Diane Vacca

Compared to the Johnson ads, Goldwater’s were old-fashioned, with extensive use of talking-head endorsements and a series of commercials emulating "Eisenhower Answers America." The ads reflected the fundamental problem of Goldwater’s campaign, namely that he was almost always on the defensive, constantly explaining his statements or responding to charges against him. The ads probably exacerbated Goldwater’s problems by keeping the original charges (of war-mongering, of intending to dismantle Social Security) in the public consciousness.

Barry Goldwater | Keith Croes Blog

The Goldwater campaign vigorously protested the ad. Republican National Committee chairman Dean Burch said, "This horror-type commercial is designed to arouse basic emotions and has no place in the campaign." The Democrats withdrew it, but the controversy led to its being replayed in its entirety on network news and commentary programs, and the "daisy girl" made the cover of .