Biography of President Abraham Lincoln for Kids - Ducksters

Hebron (meaning "league" or "confederacy"), about 19 miles SSW of Jerusalem, close to the Tree of Mamre, where Abraham lived during several periods in his life (13:18; 14:13; 18:1), built an altar, and witnessed an appearance of the Lord. At Sarah's death, he purchased a burial cave at nearby Machpelah from Ephron the Hittite (23:1-20) . Numbers 32:22 says that Hebron was built seven years before the Egyptian city of Zoan (Tanis), probably a Hyksos building project, dating it at approximately 1700 BC, thought it had probably been inhabited since the Early Bronze period onward. The traditional site of the cave of Machpelah is now marked by a mosque, formerly a Crusader church. Little archaeological excavation has been done here.[21]

Site of the Annual Abraham Lincoln National Railsplitter Contest & Crafts Festival

Lincoln College is a private liberal arts college, fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. In a small, residential campus setting, the college uniquely empowers students to realize their full potential. Lincoln College has had a long tradition of personal education before the concept became universally popular. The tradition, guiding mission, faculty philosophy, student services, and low faculty-student ratio enable the college to provide the important element of individualized attention that makes the difference between failure and success for many students.


Abraham Lincoln: An Extraordinary Life - Tech Learning

About Lincoln College
Lincoln College is a private liberal arts college, fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. In a small, residential campus setting, the college uniquely empowers students to realize their full potential. Lincoln College has long fostered a personal approach to education. It has had a tradition of personal education before the concept became universally popular. The tradition, guiding mission, faculty philosophy, student services, and low faculty-student ratio enable the college to provide the important element of individualized attention that makes the difference between failure and success for many students.


general info | The Abraham Lincoln Institute

Lincoln long believed in conceding unimportant points to political and legal rivals while he concentrated on the most important point. For Lincoln in the 1850s, the big point was preventing the spread of slavery. As President, the big point was preserving the Union – and then ending slavery as well. Historian Eric Foner wrote that “Through the crisis Lincoln displayed remarkable consistency. He proved willing to compromise on issues he had always considered inessential, but refused to countenance any concession that ran the risk of sundering the Republican party and surrendering the results of the election before his administration.”48

Abraham Lincoln - Mini Biography - Biography

Honesty was a key value for Lincoln throughout his life. Criticizing a well-to-do political opponent in the 1830s, young Lincoln said: “I would rather die now, than, like the gentleman, change my politics, and simultaneous with the change receive an office worth $3,000 per year, and then have to erect a lightning-rod over my house to protect a guilty conscience from an offended God.”32 In an 1846 letter, Lincoln wrote: “I believe it is an established maxim in morals that he who makes an assertion without knowing whether it is true or false, is guilty of falsehood; and the accidental truth of the assertion does not justify or excuse him.”33

Abraham Lincoln Pre-Presidential Political Timeline

But it was passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854 that excited Mr. Lincoln to complex moral analysis and tough political action. He saw the legislation, sponsored by Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas, as an attack on the equality principle of the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration and the Constitution were fundamental to Lincoln’s values. Historian Mark E. Neely, Jr., wrote: “Although Lincoln took his economic ideas almost uncritically from the Whig party, his view of the American revolution more closely resembled that of the Jacksonian Democrats. Characteristically, Lincoln saw the United States as dating neither from Plymouth Rock nor from the Constitution, but from the Declaration of Independence.”16 It was the Declaration which was the bedrock of Lincoln’s principles.