Henry James - Biography and Works

The ghost story was a form James used often; it was for him what the romance (a tale of the extra-ordinary) was for the earlier American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne: a middle ground for the meeting of what Hawthorne called "the actual and the imaginary." The British novelist Virginia Woolf suggested that James "uses the supernatural effectively....

In the same issue of the magazine is Sir Edmund Orme, a tale by Henry James.

Lost Nothing (2016) utilizes an intimate monologue to examine the daily impact of social conditions on the life of one man, Willie James Crittenden. Sound That and Fe26 (both 2014) offer diverging glimpses of labor utilizing beguiling objects made by the artist. In Ears, Nose and Throat (2016), while receiving a medical exam a woman recounts having witnessed a murder. Fastest Man in the State (2017), codirected by Claudrena N. Harold, reflects on the experience of one of the first African American scholarship athletes at the University of Virginia. Finally, Eason (2016) explores the legacy of the Great Migration by following the trajectory of James Walker Hood Eason, the assassinated leader of the Universal Negro Improvement Association.


The Monster/Angel Dichotomy in Henry James’s The …

Henry James wrote, "Only make the reader's general vision of evil intense enough...

Born in 1983 in Boston, MA
Lives in Brooklyn, NYJames N. Kienitz Wilkins uses formal experimentation with language and performance in films that reflect on the intersections of race, class, and technology. B-ROLL with Andre, for example, features three disembodied and disguised narrators who in turn recount the titular Andre’s time in prison and his obsessions with popular culture and video technologies. By concealing their identities using a voice encoder and stock footage of a figure in a hoodie, an American icon of Black masculinity, Kienitz Wilkins invites the viewer to make assumptions about these narrators in a dance of moral ambiguity. Pivoting around the voir dire examination that precedes a trial in which prospective jurors are questioned about their backgrounds and potential biases, Mediums blends scripted dialogue with appropriated text from jury-selection pamphlets, automotive manuals, fast-food–franchise contracts, and blog posts. The result is a collage of semifictional characters with real-world knowledge who trade information and form alliances, ultimately emphasizing the value of autonomy within mandatory civic participation.Screenings: