A report I had to do on Plato's Allegory of the Cave.

PLATO AGREED THAT SUCH KNOWLEDGE AS IS BASED UPON OUR SENSE, EXPERIENCES WOULD BE RELATIVE AN NOT ABSOLUTE, BUT HE WOULD NOT ACCEPT THE SOPHISTS' NOTION THAT ALL KNOWLEDGE IS RELATIVE, "THE IGNORANT" (ACCEPT THE SOPHISTS) WRITES PLATO, HAVE NO SINGLE MARK BEFORE THEIR EYES AT WHICH THEY MUST AIM IN ALL THE CONDUCT OF THEIR LIVES..." IF ALL WE COULD KNOW WERE THE SHADOWS, WE COULD NEVER HAVE RELIABLE KNOWLEDGE, FOR THESE SHADOWS WOULD ALWAYS CHANGE IN SIZE AND SHAPE DEPENDING UPON, THE TO US, UNKNOWN MOTIONS OF THE REAL OBJECTS, PLATO WAS CONVINCED THAT THE HUMAN MIND COULD DISCOVER THAT, "SINGLE MARK" THAT "REAL" OBJECT BEHIND ALL THE MULTITUDE OF SHADOWS, SO THAT THE MIND COULD ATTAIN TRUE KNOWLEDGE.

The fun of the allegory is to try to put all the details of the  into your interpretation.

First, Plato noted that the just life of an aristocratic person arises from an effortless harmony among internal elements of the soul,while the unjust life of a tyrranic person can maintain its characteristic imbalance only by the exertion of an enormous effort.


All they can see is the wall of the cave.

-- Allegory of the Cave Plato illustrates his dualistic theory of reality by his famous Allegory of the Cave, at the beginning of Book VII of the Republic.


HOW WOULD SUCH A PERSON FEEL ABOUT HIS PREVIOUS LIFE IN THE CAVE?

In turn, the name "Plato," , "Broad," looks like a nickname, and it goes along with stories that Plato not only was broad shouldered but that his build enabled him to actually compete in the as a wrestler.

The common man sees nothing but the shadows on the wall of the cave.

The was the last thing Plato wrote, at eighty, and it is a grim and terrifying culmination of the totalitarian tendencies in his earlier political thought.

He's the person who came out of the cave and became enlightened.

At the end of the passage, Plato expresses another of his favorite ideas: that education is not a process of putting knowledge into empty minds, but of making people realize that which they already know.

We all know what exists outside the cave.

()This argument relies more heavily upon adoption of Plato's entire theory of human nature, as developed in and other dialogues;it is likely to influence only those who have already experienced the full range of intellectual advantages for themselves.

The cave is their world and what they see is their truth.

Arithmetic provides for the preliminary development of abstract concepts, but Plato held that geometry is especially valuable for its careful attention to the eternal forms.

Plato does that in Book VIII of the by examining "imperfect" states.

Finally, Plato resorted to myth (just as he had at the close of the by imagining that justice will be rewarded with steady progression in a series of lives hereafter.