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SERIALIZATION: Publication of a longer work piecemeal over a series of weeks or months (or years), often in periodicals like newspapers or magazines. Publishers might find specific works suitable for serial publication for a number of economic or practical reasons, ranging from maximizing sales profits (by charging more per unit than they could feasibly charge for the collective work--spreading out the purchase cost for the reader over time), minimizing risk (so publishers can terminate the literary project with only one or two short publications rather than the expense of publishing one massive tome if it proves unpopular), or simply allowing the author of unfinished works a chance to test the waters before completing the work. Examples of serialized works include Lewis' The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and Stephen King's The Green Mile.

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(The more thorough their notes, the more they can review for the test and the more likely they will know other students' questions.)Teachers can take the students' questions and compile them into a test that fits the students' level of learning, gives stylistic variety, and savesthe teacher time and work.


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SLEEPING HERO MOTIF: A motif common in Celtic folklore and Arthurian literature in which the heroes or mythological beings of old are not dead, but rather sleeping, waiting in heaven, or stored in alternative worlds like Fairyland. At some future time, they will awake or be called forth to fulfill some important function. In the legends of King Arthur, for instance, Malory recounts him as "Rex quandam et rex futurus," the once and future king who will return to Britain in the hour of its greatest need. We see 20th-century versions of this recreated in C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. For instance, in Prince Caspian, Caspian's forces re-summon High King Peter and the other Pevensie children to save them from the Telmarine usurpers. More apocalyptically, in The Last Battle, we read of how a giant named Time sleeps in a cavern under the earth, waiting for Aslan to wake him so he can blow his horn to summon the stars from the sky before he plucks the sun of Narnia and destroys the world. Anthropologists might argue that, in the Christian tradition, the idea that Christ will have a second coming and return to earth is another example of the motif.